WATER QUALITY

While aquatic ecosystems are the richest habitats by number and diversity of species, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) noted that aquatic ecosystems services are deteriorating faster than those in many other natural systems. Biodiversity loss, for example, is highest amongst aquatic species (Strayer and Dudgeon 2010). The declining state of aquatic ecosystems and their inability to provide ecosystem services is evident. UNEP prioritizes the tackling of global water quality in collaboration with UN-Water and several other stakeholders. In recognition of the increasing challenges caused by deteriorating water quality, UN-Water established the Thematic Priority Area (TPA) on Water Quality and a Task Force on Wastewater Management in 2010 and entrusted their coordination to UNEP. 

These Guidelines are to help countries develop standards, policies and frameworks to protect their aquatic resources

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This assessment aims to identify current and future freshwater quality and evaluate policy options.....

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The compendium will be a reference and resource tool for governments and stakeholders.....

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The greatest sources of marine litter are land-based activities, including waste from dumping sites along coasts or river banks.

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Excess nutrients from industrial and agricultural activity impacts the pollution of water supplies and the oceans.

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Wastewater when poorly managed has a direct impact on the biological diversity of aquatic ecosystems.

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