Sascha Gabizon
Sascha Gabizon
Topic: Healthy Environment

Sascha Gabizon is the executive director of WECF International (www.wecf.org), a network of women, environment and develop...

About Icon
Number of questions: [2]
Posted on 30/04/2016 11:17:57
Dear Sascha, I am worried about the adverse impact of endocrine disrupting chemicals on women and men - what should we be urging UNEP and the WHO to do urgently on this ? What are the links between gender and the environment that WECF is working on and how can we support your work ? Thank you Helen
Helen Lynn (from United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland)
Dear Helen, thank you for that important question on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are chemicals found in many daily use products such as plastics, but also pesticides. Unfortunately these EDCs are hardly regulated. Especially early life exposure is a great problem, as it is linked to irreversible diseases and disorders such as autism, attention deficit syndrome, diabetes, obesitas, hormonal cancer, infertility and problems of reproductive organs. Research has initially provided data on reduced sperm counts and fertility of men, but increasingly also for e.g. breast cancer. UNEP and WHO are both important in addressing these EDC chemicals at global level, and are already working on EDCs, but more should be done. UNEP and WHO can provide guidance for governments to ban known EDCs from products such as food packaging, baby bottles, carbon paper used in cashier machines, plastic tubes used in neonatal departments of hospitals, plasticisers used in cosmetics etc. UNEP and WHO can also as well as how to inform parents on protecting themselves and children who are the most vulnerable: e.g. messages to avoid plastics, pesticides, non-sticky pans, electronics for children and if you want to become pregnant, and if possible use home-grown organic food and eco-labelled products. These are the short term measures, but longterm all governments need regulation to phase-out and substitute all hormone disrupters with safe, often non-chemical alternatives, this is also good for innovation and the local economy. WECF International has been working on the issue of women and chemicals since its beginning, and have numerous publications on our website in many different languages (www.wecf.org) as well as a website specifically to inform parents, see e.g, the French website http://www.projetnesting.fr . We encourage UNEP and WHO to work with WECF and other NGOs which have as aim to translate scientific and research data to practical hands on advice for consumers. A global information campaign is needed, in particular in the global South. Let me know if there is anything else you would specifically like to know. Best greetings, Sascha

Posted on 30/04/2016 11:04:35
MAM,
HOW HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT (LIKE IN 21 ST CENTURY) AT FAST PACE GO TOGETHER ...? WHERE CONSUMPTION IS MORE AND REQUIRED MORE TO FEED A GREATER NUMBER OF HUNGERS..?
ABHISHEK SINGH (from India)
Dear Abhishek Sing. Thank you very much for your question, which is a question which many people ask, as we have been made to think that only with more hazardous pesticides and more energy the world can be fed. Many studies by international food agencies have shown that this is not the case, organic farming without hazardous chemicals can feed everybody, what is necessary is fair prices, access and redistribution of land, and ending speculation on land and land grabbing. Many countries have developed laws to protect small farmers and that is good, but the pressure from large investors is still growing and continues to put small farmers under pressure. I thank you very much for that important question and send my best greetings to India! Sascha