IETC

International Environmental Technology Centre 

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IETC; Information Resources; Publications

IETC PUBLICATIONS 

Waste management publications 

 

Water & sanitation publications
(former focal area)

 

Disaster prevention publications
(former focal area)

Waste Management Publications

 The Japanese industrial waste experience: Lessons for rapidly industrializing countries, March 2014

日本の産業廃棄物管理における経験と発展 ―急速に工業化する開発途上国に向けて, March 2014

The Japanese industrial waste experience: Lessons for rapidly industrializing countries analyzes the Japanese case and highlights the potential relevance of Japan’s experience in industrial waste management for sustainable development in rapidly industrializing countries. Read more



Guidelines for the development, review and updating of National Waste Management Strategies (NWMS)The Guidelines for National Waste Management Strategies: Moving from Challenges to Opportunities, October 2013

The Guidelines for National Waste Management Strategies: Moving from Challenges to Opportunities provides a conceptual and methodological framework for national planning that countries may adapt to their particular circumstances. It also establishes a clear rationale for making waste management a national priority. Read more...




E-waste Volume III

E-waste Volume III - WEEE/e-waste “Take back system”, August 2013

This manual aims to build the capacity of practitioners and decision makers to guide and assist them in understanding, planning, designing and implementing WEEE/e-waste take-back schemes for use by cities or other localized areas or for use at a nation-wide level. The manual describes various components of Policy Framework, including regulatory systems and collection and transport systems, along with financial aspects and case studies of schemes currently underway.



SAT manualApplication of the Sustainability Assessment of Technologies Methodology: Guidance Manual, Nov 2012

When making decisions on investments, economic considerations often takes precedence over environmental and social factors. This may lead to unsustainable decisions and investments.The SAT methodology guidance manual aims at providing decision makers with the right analysis to select the appropriate technology, from a combined economic, social, environmental and technical perspective.

 


Compendium of Recycling/Destruction Technologies for Waste Oils

Compendium of Recycling and Destruction Technologies for Waste Oils, Nov 2012

Waste oil (used oil) is a growing hazardous waste stream closely linked with rapid industrialization and increased automobile use. Recycling and disposal of waste oils is feasible and will not only avoid the negative impacts on human health and the environment but also help to conserve finite resources. A compendium of recycling and destruction technologies for waste oils has been developed.

 

 


Waste Oile Palm Tree Report Converting Waste Oil Palm trees into a Resource, Sep 2012

Oil palm trees are the most important plantation crop in Malaysia and Indonesia. Each year several million trees are felled and large quantities of biomass waste generated. But currently, this resource is under-utilized.

In order to explore potential uses for this biomass, a study was carried out in Malaysia to determine the feasibility of converting waste oil palm trees (WPT) into a resource, either as raw material for various industrial applications or for utilization in energy generation.

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Compendium of Technologies for Treatment/Destruction of Healthcare Waste, Sep 2012Compendium of Technologies for Treatment/Destruction of Healthcare Waste, Sep 2012

Management of healthcare waste is becoming an issue of growing concern particularly in urban areas. In many developing countries it is still indiscriminately disposed of and often mixed with municipal waste, thus causing serious health and environmental hazards, particularly to the scavengers operating at dump sites. The technologies for the treatment of healthcare waste are not well understood or widely available in developing countries. As a result,if technology choices are made, they may not be well-informed, resulting in poor or uneconomic performance.

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Waste and Climate Change – Global Trends and Strategy Framework, Nov 2010

Waste and Climate Change – Global Trends and Strategy Framework, Nov 2010

The sound management of waste can have substantial co-benefits for efforts to address climate change. As a first step to realize these co-benefits, this report seeks

  • To examine the potential of climate impacts and benefits of different waste management activities.

  • To present a UNEP-led framework strategy to assist countries in prioritizing their resources and efforts for waste management and climate change mitigation.

The framework strategy is intended to align with the internationally recognized waste management hierarchy, in which waste prevention receives the highest priority, to optimize the co-benefits for climate change mitigation. The Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has directed its International Environmental Technology Centre (IETC) branch to take action in the area of waste management.

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Lessons Learned on Mainstreaming Pilot Projects into Larger Projects, Dec 2009Lessons Learned on Mainstreaming Pilot Projects into Larger Projects, Dec 2009 (PDF 246KB)

This report summarizes lessons learned from implementing Environmentally Sound Technology (EST) pilot projects by the International Environmental Technology Centre of UNEP Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (UNEP-DTIE-IETC). The document aims to inform national level mainstreaming of the EST pilot project results, and provides lessons learned for decision-makers in national governments and for international technical cooperation personnel. The featured projects were conducted within three pillars of IETC’s focal areas. They are: Support for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands project in the water-sanitation pillar; Integrated Solid Waste Management project in China, India and Lesotho under the waste management pillar; and ESTs for Building waste Reduction in Indonesia (DEBRI) project under the disaster management pillar. Each project and cross-cutting lessons learned focus on six areas, which are project management structure, governance, capacity building, EST implementation, financing, and local conditions/infrastructure.

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Converting Waste Plastics into a Resource – Assessment Guidelines, Dec 2009Converting Waste Plastics into a Resource – Assessment Guidelines, Dec 2009 (PDF 678KB)

Economic growth and the change of consumption and production patterns are resulting in rapid increase in generation of waste plastics in the world. The world’s annual consumption of plastic materials has increased from around 5 million tonnes in the 1950s to nearly 100 million tonnes nowadays. Waste plastics are one of the most promising resources for fuel production. This document aims to raise awareness and assist on the collection and analysis of data to generate a baseline on waste plastics to further develop viable business propositions for converting waste plastics into fuels.

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Converting Waste Plastics into a Resource – Compendium of Technologies, Dec 2009 Converting Waste Plastics into a Resource – Compendium of Technologies, Dec 2009 (PDF 1.4MB)

Economic growth and the change of consumption and production patterns are resulting in rapid increase in generation of waste plastics in the world. The world’s annual consumption of plastic materials has increased from around 5 million tonnes in the 1950s to nearly 100 million tonnes nowadays. Waste plastics are one of the most promising resources for fuel production; however the effective conversion requires appropriate technologies to be selected according to local economic, environmental, social and technical circumstances. This compendium is compiled to assisst in the selection process. Technologies for conversion of plastics to solid, liquid and gaseous fuels are listed in it.

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Converting Waste Agricultural Biomass into a Resource – Compendium of Technologies, Oct 2009Converting Waste Agricultural Biomass into a Resource – Compendium of Technologies, Oct 2009 (PDF 5.2MB)

Globally, 140 billion metric tons of biomass wastes are generated every year from agriculture equivalent to about 50 billion tons of oil. As raw materials, biomass wastes have attractive potentials for both large-scale industries and community-level enterprises. For efficient and effective conversion, appropriate selection of technologies is one of the vital pre-conditions. This compendium is compiled to assist in the selection process for the technologies. The technologies for different type of waste agricultural biomass and different sizes are also considered. Technologies listed in the Compendium are limited to those that use cellulosic agricultural waste biomass.

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Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 1: Waste Characterization and Quantification with Projections for Future, Jun 2009Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 1: Waste Characterization and Quantification with Projections for Future, Jun 2009 (PDF 884KB)

This book is the first volume in the series of training manuals on developing integrated solid waste management (ISWM) plans. It aims to build the capacity of practitioners and policy makers in waste characterization and quantification with projections for the future for all waste generating sectors viz.: residential, commercial, construction and demolition, healthcare and industrial sectors. The objective of the manual is to facilitate characterization of different types of wastes from each sector and quantification of the level of waste generation. The manual provides a methodology to conduct studies leading to collection and analysis of the data from different sectors. An example has been worked out to make this manual user friendly.

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Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 2: Assessment of Current Waste Management System and Gaps therein, Jun 2009Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 2: Assessment of Current Waste Management System and Gaps therein, Jun 2009 (PDF 294KB)

This book is the second volume in the series of training manuals on developing integrated solid waste management (ISWM) plans. It aims to build the capacity of practitioners and policy makers for assessing current waste management systems and practices covering all the stages of waste management chain viz.: primary generation and disposal, collection and transportation, sorting and material recovery for recycling, treatment and resource recovery, and final disposal. The objective of the manual is to facilitate identification of important aspects of waste management system and gaps therein with reference to regulations, institutional arrangements, financial mechanisms, technology and infrastructure, and roles and responsibilities of various stakeholders in the current system. The manual provides a methodology to conduct studies leading to collection and analysis of the information.

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Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 3: Targets and Issues of Concern for ISWM, Jun 2009 Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 3: Targets and Issues of Concern for ISWM, Jun 2009 (PDF 301KB)

This book is the third volume in the series of training manuals on developing integrated solid waste management (ISWM) plans. It aims to build the capacity of practitioners and policy makers for setting targets for ISWM and identifying stakeholders’ issues of concern. The manual also provides guidelines for conducting stakeholder consultation to identify their concerns with reference to financial aspects, environmental impacts, technology considerations and cultural aspects.

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Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 4: ISWM Plan, Jun 2009Developing Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan – Training Manual Vol. 4: ISWM Plan, Jun 2009 (PDF 3.6MB)

This book is the fourth and last volume in the series of training manuals on developing integrated solid waste management (ISWM) plans. It aims to build the capacity of practitioners and policy makers for developing a comprehensive ISWM plan by utilizing the information collected earlier regarding waste characterization and quantification, assessment of current waste management system and gaps therein, and targets and issues of concern for ISWM. The manual provides a methodology for developing the ISWM Plan utilizing the information from Volume 1 and Volume 2 as baseline information and information from Volume 3 for contextualizing the Plan. The manual also provides guidelines for developing specific projects/schemes along with an implementation strategy.

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Resource Augmentation by Tapping Renewable Resources and by Utilizing Waste in Viet Nam, Feb 2008Resource Augmentation by Tapping Renewable Resources and by Utilizing Waste in Viet Nam, Feb 2008 (PDF 646KB)

Rapidly growing countries are facing challenges on two fronts. Firstly, they need to ensure continuous availability of resources to support rapid industrialization and improved living standards. Secondly, they have to control pollution from industrial and municipal sources. To address both of these challenges with one strategy, UNEP implemented the project in the sugar industry in Viet Nam to harvest rainwater, to reuse wastewater and to convert organic waste into compost. Rainwater harvesting and wastewater reuse reduced the demand for freshwater and it also helped to reduce the quantity of wastewater to be discharged. This, in addition to environmental benefits, also helped the sugar industry to save on the fees for obtaining freshwater and on the charges for discharging wastewater. Compost from organic waste in sugar industry helped their farmers, who supply sugarcane, to reduce their costs for buying fertilizer. The project was implemented in partnership with the Viet Nam Cleaner Production Centre. The local partners and technical staff from the sugar industry were trained to undertake designing and implementation of environmentally sound technologies for rainwater harvesting, wastewater reuse and composting.

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E-Waste Vol. 1: Inventory Assessment Manual, Dec 2007E-Waste Vol. 1: Inventory Assessment Manual, Dec 2007 (PDF 1.7MB)

This first volume of E-waste manual aims to build the capacity of practitioners and policy makers for preparing WEEE/E-waste inventories. The objective of the manual is to identify E-waste as an environmental issue and to quantify it. It summarizes the available legislation on WEEE/E-waste in different countries and provides a methodology to design and use E-waste inventory assessment studies/projects. Furthermore, the E-waste management chain (starting from electrical and electronic equipment manufacture, production, import, consumption, E-waste generation, treatment and disposal) has been discussed to identify the "mechanism of trading" and related socio-economic and environmental risks. Methodologies for E-waste inventory assessment in a city/geographical area/country have been elaborated with reference to developing countries. The manual also provides case studies from developing countries.

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E-Waste Vol. 2: E-waste Management Manual, Dec 2007E-Waste Vol. 2: E-waste Management Manual, Dec 2007 (PDF 2.2MB)

This second volume of E-waste manual aims to build the capacity of practitioners and policy makers for preparing and developing WEEE/E-waste management systems. It summarizes current practices in developed and developing countries on WEEE/E-waste management, the technologies for E-waste management (collection, transportation, treatment and disposal) and the important pre-requisites for effective and sustainable WEEE/E-waste management. A conceptual approach for developing regulatory systems for E-waste management has been provided for policy makers. Current practices for E-waste management have been reviewed from developed and developing countries. Financial viability of E-waste management has been discussed for effective and sustainable E-waste management. A case study from a developing country, which describes each aspect of E-waste management including techno-economic feasibility of establishing E-waste treatment facility is also presented.

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Strategic Elements in Implementing the 3R Platform: UNEP’s Contribution, March 2006 Strategic Elements in Implementing the 3R Platform: UNEP’s Contribution, March 2006 (PDF 70KB)

As a contribution to the 3R Ministerial Meeting of April 2005, UNEP launched the “3R Platform” as an implementing mechanism for the 3R initiative in developing countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The platform provides support for concrete 3R activities, such as demonstration projects and institutional strengthening exercises, building on experiences in Japan and other countries, and tailoring them to the needs and specific conditions of each country. This document is intended to outline the strategic elements that can guide the activities implemented under the umbrella of the 3R Platform. It outlines the key areas and themes that need to be focused on in implementing the 3R approach.

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Training Module: Closing an Open Dumpsite and Shifting from Open Dumping to Controlled Dumping and to Sanitary Land Filling, 2005Training Module: Closing an Open Dumpsite and Shifting from Open Dumping to Controlled Dumping and to Sanitary Land Filling, 2005 (PDF 4MB)

A policy shift from open dumping to sanitary landfilling has implications on local preparedness to operate and manage a landfill as well as on how the current dumpsites will be abandoned. Consequently, there is a need to build and enhance the technical and management capacities of local authorities. In recognition of this need and as part of UNEP global effort to promote environmentally sound technologies, IETC developed training programmes for capacity building. This publication is a Training Module on Solid Waste Management designed especially for local authorities and their staff.

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Integrated Waste Management Scoreboard, Dec 2005 Integrated Waste Management Scoreboard, Dec 2005 (PDF 608KB) (IETC Integrative Series)

This publication presents an Integrated Waste Management Scoreboard, which is a planning tool that incorporates a methodology for evaluating existing municipal solid waste management programs and systems. It has been developed by the United Nations Environment Program for use by representatives from governmental authorities in the ASEAN Region as well as for communities and institutions that are involved in management of municipal solid waste. It can be applied at the national, state/provincial/regional, municipal, community, and institutional levels.

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Solid Waste Management, Dec 2005Solid Waste Management, Dec 2005

This publication looks at the use of technologies that are environmentally sound for managing municipal solid wastes in developing countries. It is designed as a sourcebook on solid waste management, covering a multitude of topics including the principles of solid waste management, processing and treatment, and final disposal. It also covers key non-technical aspects, and offers regional overviews on solid waste management.

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Research on Eco-Towns in Japan: Implications and Lessons for Developing Countries and Cities, Jun 2005Research on Eco-Towns in Japan: Implications and Lessons for Developing Countries and Cities, Jun 2005 (PDF 1MB)

Eco-towns in Japan were developed in the last 10 years by utilizing regional technology and industry in Japan. Local governments and enterprises have worked in partnership to build such complexes. Eco-towns have enabled a number of developmental objectives to be met simultaneously. It has helped to stimulate the local economy, secure employment, as well as dispose waste in an environmentally sound manner, and protect air and water resources. A number of lessons have been learnt in the setting up of such eco towns in Japan, not only within these eco-towns, but also on the cities where they are located. This report focuses on identifying the key lessons learnt in the setting up of the eco-towns. These lessons will help in the development of step-by-step guidelines that will help local / national governments to set up eco-towns in their countries. The report was produced by the Global Environment Centre Foundation with inputs from IETC.

Download PDF Download PDF

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State of Waste Management in South East Asia, 2004State of Waste Management in South East Asia, 2004

This report is a result of a small survey conducted in 2002 by UNEP IETC in cooperation with the ASEAN Working Group for Multilateral Environmental Agreements (AWGMEA). The survey was undertaken to prepare a background paper on waste management in the sub-region prior to the holding in Kuala Lumpur in October 2002 of an ASEAN High Level Consultation Meeting. The focus is a proposal to establish a regional framework for collaboration in sustainable integrated waste management. This is a joint publication of UNEP IETC and the ASEAN Secretariat. It is envisaged to be a reference for planning, programming and policy reviews on waste management in each member state of ASEAN. It is also planned to be updated every two years so that it can serve as a supplement to the GEO, a biennial publication of UNEP, on the specialized area of waste management.

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Former Focal Areas

Waste management publications

 

Water & sanitation publications

 

Disaster prevention publications

The publications listed below relate to a former focal area and are made available for archiving purposes only. IETC does not conduct activities in this field anymore. For updated infromation about our projects and activities, please consult:

 
Our home page  
Waste management activities    Our publications

Support for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands: 2004-2009Support for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands: 2004-2009, English version: Jan 2010 (PDF 2.5MB) / Arabic version: Jun 2010 (PDF 3.2MB)

The completion report for the “UNEP Support for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands” project has been published. This publication presents the background of the project, project activities, and major outputs and benefits achieved for all the project phases. The report also makes recommendations on additional initiatives to improve the environmental conditions for the Marshlands area as well as for the country.

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Training Manuals for the Support for Environmental Management of Iraqi Marshlands Project (in English and Arabic)

As part of every training course delivered under UNEP’s project, Support for the Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands, UNEP in collaboration with various partner institutions produced training manuals. All of the manuals deal with different aspects of sustainable environmental management of the Marshlands and cover subject matter under three categories: policy and institutional, technical, and data management and analysis. All manuals published within the framework of this project are available to download in both English and Arabic.

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Waste Statibilization Ponds and Constructed Wetlands - design Manual, 2005Waste Stabilization Ponds and Constructed Wetlands - Design Manual, 2005

The design manual for waste stabilization ponds and constructed wetlands presented in this CD ROM gives a comprehensive technical information about their planning, design and operation.

Also a number of numerical models are included to assist in finding the size of a constructed wetland or stabilization pond, reduce the concentration of heavy metals, phosphorous and nitrogen amongst other important variables. The manual is the result of a joint co-operation between the Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, with the support of the Danish International Development Agency (Danida).

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Every Drop Counts: Environmentally Sound Technologies for Urban and Domestic Water Use Efficiency, Nov 2008Every Drop Counts: Environmentally Sound Technologies for Urban and Domestic Water Use Efficiency, Nov 2008

The publication relates to efficient water use in urban and domestic environments through water use efficiency maximizing and optimizing between safe and sufficient supply and demand. It also deals with overall policies and criteria for selecting Environmentally Sound Technologies (ESTs) and their application. A comprehensive set of Fact Sheets of ESTs applicable for the the Urban Water Cycle is part of the publication. Every Drop Counts also includes a CD ROM with capacity building materials and an Excel-based model “WiseWater” designed to analyze the potential application of ESTs at household as well as at property level.

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Eutrophication Management PAMOLARE2 - Shallow Lakes - model,Dec 2005Eutrophication Management PAMOLARE2 - Shallow Lakes - model,Dec 2005

The PAMOLARE2 model uses structurally dynamic principles for the management of eutrophication in shallow lakes. This model complements the first version of PAMOLARE launched by IETC and ILEC in 2002, which included a series of models for eutrophication management but did not address the interactions between algae, macrophites and fish.

 

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Integrated Watershed Management ManualIntegrated Watershed Management - Ecohydrology & Phytotechnology - Part 1 & 2 / Part 3 & 4

The manual is one of the results of the co-operation between the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization - International Hydrological Programme (UNESCO-IHP), represented by the Regional Bureau for Science in Europe (UNESCO-ROSTE) and the United Nations Environment Programme - Division of Technology, Industry and Economics - International Environmental Technology Centre (UNEP DTIE IETC).

It contains results of the first joint Ecohydrology & Phytotechnology Demonstration Project "Application of Ecohydrology and Phytotechnology for Water Resources Management and Sustainable Development on the Pilica River catchment" in the Republic of Poland. The project was undertaken by the International Centre for Ecology, Polish Academy of Sciences (ICE-PAS) and Centre for Ecohydrological Studies, University of Lodz (CEHSUL).

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Water and Wastewater Reuse - An Environmentally Sound Approach for Sustainable Urban Water Management , Nov 2005 Water and Wastewater Reuse - An Environmentally Sound Approach for Sustainable Urban Water Management , Nov 2005

Water scarcity and water pollution pose a critical challenge in many developing countries. In urban areas, it is becoming difficult for the authorities to manage water supply and wastewater. Strategies for water and wastewater reuse can improve urban water management.

This publication provides introductory guidelines for these strategies. The important aspects to minimize public health risks are identified. The possibilities of wastewater reuse in agriculture, industry, urban uses, and environmental water enhancement including groundwater recharge are discussed with the help of practical examples.

The capacity building policy-making, institutional strengthening, financial mechanisms, and awareness raising and stakeholder participation are vital to implement these strategies for wastewater reuse.

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Report of the UNEP Roundtable on Iraqi Marshland Management, 2005Report of the UNEP Roundtable on Iraqi Marshland Management (PDF 1.4MB), 2005

The Amman Roundtable on Iraqi Marshland Management was organized by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on 21 and 22 September 2004 in Amman, Jordan. The Roundtable was one of the initial activities for UNEP’s “Support for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands” project, which is being implemented within the framework of the United Nations Trust Fund for Iraqi Reconstruction. Dialogue during the project preparation process, with the Iraqi counterparts, UN agencies within the UN Trust Fund mechanism, and donor agencies, identified a clear need to discuss various on-going initiatives and to facilitate coordinated response for marshland management. UNEP was requested to organize a meeting to address this need.

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Phytotechnologies; A Technical Approach in Environmental Management, [FMS7] March, 2003Phytotechnologies; A Technical Approach in Environmental Management, March, 2003

The conceptual overview of phytotechnologies and their importance in relation to various environmental problems and potential solutions. It provides the basis of a conceptual framework for understanding the importance of ecosystems approaches in helping to achieve sustainable development objectives. It also examines the role of phytotechnology in relation to some key issues including integrated water resources management, urban environmental management, biodiversity and climate change.

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Managing Urban Sewage; an Introductory Guide for Decision-makersManaging Urban Sewage; an Introductory Guide for Decision-makers, March, 2003, March, 2003

The scope of sewage management has evolved throughout history with changes in socioeconomic conditions, city structures, and the environment. Today, sewage infrastructure that is well planned and operated supports urban sanitation and related activities. Effective sewage management is essential for nutrient recycling and for maintaining ecosystem integrity.

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Guidelines for the Integrated Management of the Watershed –Phytotechnology and Ecohydrology, December, 2002Guidelines for the Integrated Management of the Watershed –Phytotechnology and Ecohydrology, December, 2002

Integrated Water Resource Management as defined by the Global Water Partnership (GWP) is a process that considers the co-ordination of development and management of water, land and related resources to enhance economic and social welfare without jeopardizing the sustainability of the ecosystem. Ecohydrology together with the application of Phytotechnology consider the basic principles of IWRM in practice.

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Biosolids Management; An Environmentally Sound Approach for Managing Sewage Treatment Plants Sludge November, 2002Biosolids Management; An Environmentally Sound Approach for Managing Sewage Treatment Plants Sludge [FMS1] November, 2002

Proper treated sludge, known as biosolids, has important economic and environmental value due to its high concentration of organic nutrients, making it valuable for use as fertilizer in agriculture or other practices in urban areas while at the same assisting in solving the enormous problem of sludge disposal.

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Phytoremediation: An Environmentally Sound Technology for Pollution Prevention, Control and Remediation November, 2002Phytoremediation: An Environmentally Sound Technology for Pollution Prevention, Control and Remediation, November, 2002

Phytoremediation is a reliable option for pollution control in soil and water, based on the properties of plants to accumulate pollutants in their roots and leaves showing that its application has also been shown to be more economical than other options. Although the practice has some limitations, it is becoming more popular due to its benefits in different countries

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Rainwater Harvesting and Utilization [UE-2], Mar 2002Rainwater Harvesting and Utilization, Mar 2002

Physical alternatives to fulfill sustainable management of freshwater include the finding of alternate or additional water resources using conventional centralized approaches; or better utilizing the limited amount of water resources available in a more efficient way. Among the various alternative technologies to augment freshwater resources, rainwater harvesting and utilization is a decentralized, environmentally sound solution.

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International Source Book on Environmentally Sound Technologies for Wastewater and Stormwater Management, March, 2002International Source Book on Environmentally Sound Technologies for Wastewater and Stormwater Management, March, 2002

The urgent need for information on how to deal with wastewater is clearly shown by the fact that nearly 3 billion people are without adequate sanitation and its impact on health economic productivity and environmental degradation. This publication provides information on ESTs applied for wastewater and stormwater management.

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Environmentally Sound Technologies in wastewater treatment for the implementation of the UNEP Global Programme of Action (GPA) "Guidance On Municipal Wastewater, January, 2002Environmentally Sound Technologies in wastewater treatment for the implementation of the UNEP Global Programme of Action (GPA) "Guidance On Municipal Wastewater, January, 2002

This document has been prepared by UNEP DTIE IETC as a contribution to the UNEP GPA and is based upon the "Recommendations for Decision-making on Municipal Wastewater: Practical Policy Guidance for Implementing the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities (GPA) on Sewage" (Version 10 November 2000). It is recognized that this latter document is under review and will be replaced by "Guidance on Municipal Wastewater: Practical Guidance for Implementing the Global Programme of Action for the Protection of the Marine Environment from Land-based Activities (GPA) on Sewage" that is being prepared. Therefore, the UNEP DTIE IETC document will be subject to revision following adoption of this latter document by the UNEP GPA.

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 Former Focal Areas

Waste management publications

 

Water & sanitation publications

 

Disaster prevention publications

 

The publications listed below relate to a former focal area and are made available for archiving purposes only. IETC does not conduct activities in this field anymore. For updated infromation about our projects and activities, please consult:

 
Our home page  
Waste management activities    Our publications

Environmental Management and Disaster Preparedness: Lessons Learnt from the Tokage Typhoon (Typhoon 23 of 2004) in Japan, 2005Environmental Management and Disaster Preparedness: Lessons Learnt from the Tokage Typhoon (Typhoon 23 of 2004) in Japan, 2005 (PDF 870KB)

This UNEP study on the recent Tokage Typhoon (No. 23 of 2004) is the first in a series of publications that will help demonstrate the preparedness measures in place in Japan, and provide valuable lessons for mitigation and management in other countries facing similar disasters.

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Thematic Discussion Paper Cluster 4 - "Reducing the underlying Risk Factors" at World Conference on Disaster Reduction, 18-22 January 2005, Kobe JapanThematic Discussion Paper Cluster 4 - "Reducing the underlying Risk Factors" at World Conference on Disaster Reduction, 18-22 January 2005, Kobe Japan (PDF 166KB)

Discussion papers were prepared for the five thematic clusters of the WCDR. UNEP was a Lead Agency (along with UNCRD and WHO) for Cluster 4 - "Reducing the Underlying Risk Factors" and jointly prepared this Thematic Discussion Paper. The paper formed the basis for discussion in Cluster 4's proceedings.

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Environment Management and Disaster ReductionEnvironment Management and Disaster Reduction (PDF 313KB)

Session concept paper of UNEP Thematic Session on “Environmental Management and Disaster Reduction: Building a Multi-stakeholder Partnership” which was held on 19 January 2005 at the World Conference on Disaster Reduction in Kobe, 2005.

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Environmental Management and Disaster Preparedness - Building a multi-stakeholder partnership, 2005Environmental Management and Disaster Preparedness - Building a multi-stakeholder partnership, 2005 (PDF 3.36MB)

Proceedings of UNEP Thematic Session at the World Conference on Disaster Reduction in Kobe on 19 January 2005. The main message coming out of the session was that comprehensive understanding of natural systems, coupled with the application of management tools such as environmental evaluation and risk assessment, can make a major contribution to a reduction of risks and mitigation of any impacts. An important aspect is the involvement of a broader range of partners in such a process, and to fully engage the resources and interests of the private sector in prevention and mitigation

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Earthquake Waste Symposium Osaka, 12 - 13 June 1995 - Proceedings [TP2], January 1996Earthquake Waste Symposium Osaka, 12 - 13 June 1995 - Proceedings [TP2], January 1996 (PDF 2.95MB)

The topic of how best to utilize the debris from devastating natural disasters, whether resulting from earthquakes, hurricanes, fires, volcanic activity, or storms and the resulting floods and landslides is of great interest to local government officials, planners, policy makers, investment bankers, insurance companies, and a whole host of other groups and organizations including the UNEP. This publication covers a wide range of management responses to the problems associated with waste management resulting from disaster events.

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