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International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer

19th Meeting of the Parties

HCFCs Accelerated Phaseout

Compilation of Relevant Articles from the Press Worldwide

September 2007

Statements, Press Releases, Notes
from Governments, NGOs, Industrties, etc…

 

SUMMARY OF THE NINETEENTH MEETING OF THE PARTIES TO THE MONTREAL ...
Earth Negotiations Bulletin, Canada - Sep 23, 2007 http://www.iisd.ca/vol19/enb1960e.html
Following a one-day seminar commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, MOP-19 opened with a high-level segment on Monday, which included ...

Summary of the 19th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer: 17-21 September 2007

The nineteenth Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (MOP-19) took place in Montreal, Canada, from 17-21 September 2007.

There were over 900 participants, representing governments, UN agencies, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, academia, civil society and industry. Following a one-day seminar commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, MOP-19 opened with high-level segment on Monday, which included an awards ceremony and statements from heads of delegations. A preparatory segment of plenary was convened from Tuesday to Thursday, to address the MOPs substantive agenda items and related draft decisions. The high-level segment also continued on Tuesday and Thursday, and concluded on Friday with the adoption of decisions.

When the meeting concluded late Friday evening, MOP-19 had adopted 29 decisions, including on: an accelerated phase-out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs); essential-use nominations and other issues arising out of the 2006 reports of the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP); critical-use nominations for methyl bromide; budgets; and monitoring transboundary movements and illegal trade in ozone depleting substances (ODS). A Montreal Declaration was also adopted, which acknowledges the historic global cooperation achieved during the last 20 years under the Montreal Protocol, and reaffirms parties. Commitment to phase out consumption and production of ODS through a range of actions. A spirit of good humor pervaded the final session of the meeting with delegates lauding the cooperation and flexibility of all parties to achieve significant reductions in methyl bromide critical use exemptions and a .historic. Agreement on an accelerated HCFC phase-out.

>>> Download/Read the MOP 19 report http://ozone.unep.org/Meeting_Documents/mop/19mop/MOP_19_ReportE.pdfc

Source: The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Monday, 24 September 2007, http://www.iisd.ca/download/pdf/enb1960e.pdf

The 191 Parties to the Montreal Protocol reached a historic agreement late Friday night to strengthen the ozone treaty to address reducing greenhouse gas emissions by up to 25 billion tons of CO2 equivalent—five times more than the Kyoto Protocol will do during its initial reduction period from 2008 to 2012. It also will advance the recovery of the ozone layer by several years.

The decision speeds up by ten years the phase-out of HCFCs, chemicals that destroy the ozone layer and contribute to climate change. As part of the agreement, developed country Parties promised to continue paying into a technology fund to help developing country Parties meet their new phase-out obligations.

Summary of Decision to Accelerate the Phase-out of HCFCs

Developing Country Parties:

Base level 2009-2010 average
Freeze on 1 Jan 2013
10% reduction on 1 Jan 2015
35% on 1 Jan 2020
67,5% on 1 Jan 2025
Continuing use of  2.5% from 2030 to 2040

Developed Country Parties:

75% reduction on 1 Jan 2010
90% on 1 Jan 2015
Continuing use of 0.5% from 2020 to 2030

Full decision at http://ozone.unep.org/Meeting_Documents/mop/19mop/MOP_19_ReportE.pdf
(page 3, para F).

For additional background information, visit: http://www.igsd.org/

www.ozone-climate.org/

---------------------------------------------
Ms. Alex Viets
Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development INECE Secretariat 2300 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 300B Washington, DC 20007 or +1-213-321-0911 (mobile)
aviets@igsd.org 

 

Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Strengthened Ozone Treaty Provides Five Times Kyoto Treaty in Climate Mitigation

 

Montreal, 23 September 2007.  The 191 Parties to the Montreal Protocol reached a historic agreement late Friday night to strengthen the ozone treaty to address reducing greenhouse gas emissions by up to 25 billion tons of CO2 equivalent—five times more than the Kyoto Protocol will do during its initial reduction period from 2008 to 2012.

 

"Five times Kyoto's initial climate reductions is an extraordinary accomplishment," said Durwood Zaelke, the President of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, which coordinated a year-long effort to educate the Parties about the climate potential of the Montreal Protocol. He added that "This historic decision marks the first time both developed and developing countries have agreed to mandatory climate reductions.  This is a big boost for the post-2012 climate negotiations." Friday night's decision, reached after seven days of negotiations, also will advance the recovery of the ozone layer by several years.

 

The decision speeds up by ten years the phase-out of HCFCs, chemicals that destroy the ozone layer and contribute to climate change. As part of the agreement, developed country Parties promised to continue paying into a technology fund to help developing country Parties meet their new phase-out obligations. [See summary of decision, below, and link to official version.]

 

Success was achieved by an unusual coalition of both developing and developed country Parties working together to strengthen the treaty to realize its full potential to reduce climate emissions.  Argentina and Brazil led the developing country Parties, and were strongly supported by low-lying island and coastal countries, including Micronesia, Mauritius, and Mauritania, who were concerned by the threat of rising sea-levels that threaten their very existence.

 

The United States proposed the most aggressive phase-out schedule, supported by the Group of 8 strongest economies in the world, along with Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland.  Argentina and Brazil also proposed an aggressive phase-out of HCFCs, and worked effectively to build support from other developed country Parties. India and Mexico also were supporters.

 

China, which has the largest production and consumption of HCFCs in its air conditioning and refrigeration industry, continued its long history of faithful participation in the Montreal Protocol by joining the consensus, after long and difficult negotiations. "Their gracious statement of support in the final high-level meeting Friday night was the highlight of the meeting," said Zaelke, "demonstrating true leadership and commitment to the spirit of cooperation that is the heart of the Montreal Protocol."

 

"The decision is an enormous achievement for the environment," said Dan Reifsnyder, lead U.S. negotiator.  "When we first proposed an accelerated phase-out for HCFCs, we knew it would be a difficult undertaking but we are thrilled with the momentum it generated so quickly and now with the momentous result—not only for the ozone layer but also for the climate system."

 

The United States is hosting a meeting of the world's largest climate emitters September 27-28 in Washington, DC.  US leadership in Montreal to accelerate the phase-out of HCFCs in a way that supports energy efficiency and climate change objectives should give a boost to these talks. 

 

Argentina's Environmental Minister Romina Picolotti was an early and outspoken champion for strengthening the ozone treaty to do more for climate mitigation.  Argentina suffers from environmental and health impacts due to its close proximity to the Antarctic. "Our success is important for the ozone layer, and even more important for the climate, as it shows us what we can do when we have the spirit to cooperate," said Ms. Picolotti.  She also praised the efforts of Maas Goote from The Netherlands, who chaired the small HCFC negotiating group, noting that “Maas’s tough professionalism and his good humor played a key role in securing agreement.”  Zaelke agreed, stating that “Chairing this negotiation took a tremendous amount of skill and persistence, and Maas had it all.” 

 

"This was the right idea at the right time with the right team," said Dr. Husamuddin Ahmadzai, Senior Advisor for Enforcement and Implementation, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. "The Montreal Protocol's role in reducing climate emissions should be heralded throughout the world," he added.

 

Without the Montreal Protocol, and earlier efforts to reduce CFCs starting in 1974 when Drs. Rowland & Molina first warned of their danger, radiative forcing from ozone depleting substances would almost have matched emissions from CO2 by 2010. "This early action on ozone has delayed climate change up to a Planet-saving 35-41 years," said Scott Stone, Research Fellow at the Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development. He referred to the seminal science paper calculating the climate benefits of the Montreal Protocol by Guus Velders of the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, and colleagues at NASA, DuPont, and the US EPA. Stone also complimented Maas Goote as chair, stating that “Maas reminded the Parties of the spirit of Montreal, and like a great coach, got everyone to play their ‘A’ game for the Planet.”

 

Micronesia, Mauritius, and Mauritania, who all made proposals to speed the HCFC phase-out, reminded the Parties throughout the negotiations that the 25 billion tons of CO2 equivalent on the negotiating table would help keep the Planet from reaching the "tipping point" for abrupt and irreversible climate change, including catastrophic sea-level rise. 

 

"For small-island states, reaching consensus on this decision was a matter of survival," said Kandhi Elieisar, Assistant Secretary for Asia-Pacific Multilateral Affairs of Micronesia.

 

Mr. Sateeaved Seebaluck, Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Environment for Mauritius stated that "We proved to the world that multilateralism can produce good results when the spirit of trust and cooperation prevails. The success of  these negotiations will remain a landmark in the history of mankind and it is the best gift we could give ourselves on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Protocol." 

 

Seebaluck added, "It is yet another long stride in protection of life. My only hope is that other multilateral environmental agreements take this example and emulate the Montreal Protocol. And when we look forward that we can carry the same spirit to the negotiations for the new climate treaty that will follow the Kyoto Protocol."

 

Zaelke said, "Our success this week should give us the courage we need to move forward with a strong post-Kyoto climate agreement, starting in December in Bali," when negotiators meet to discuss the climate treaty that will succeed the Kyoto agreement.  He continued, "It also gives us some key lessons to consider as we design the post-Kyoto climate regime, including that a Montreal-type regulatory approach can work effectively and efficiently to deliver real climate reductions." 

 

Summary of Decision to Accelerate the Phase-out of HCFCs

 

Developing Country Parties:

Base level 2009-2010 average
Freeze on 1 Jan 2013
10% reduction on 1 Jan 2015
35% on 1 Jan 2020
67,5% on 1 Jan 2025
Continuing use of  2.5% from 2030 to 2040
 
Developed Country Parties:

75% reduction on 1 Jan 2010
90% on 1 Jan 2015
Continuing use of 0.5% from 2020 to 2030

 

Full decision at http://ozone.unep.org/Meeting_Documents/mop/19mop/MOP_19_ReportE.pdf

(page 3, para F).

 

 

For further information, contact:

 

Durwood Zaelke, President, or Scott Stone, Research Fellow

Institute for Governance & Sustainable Development (IGSD)

zaelke@igsd.org (202) 498-2457

sstone@igsd.org (312) 961-3819

 

Daniel Taillant (contact for Romina Picolotti)
jdtaillant@cedha.org.ar + 54 9 116 729 5466 (cell)

 

Ana Maria Kleymeyer
Advisor to Minister of Environment for Argentina, Romina Picolotti
akleymeyer@ambiente.gov.ar + 54 911 49 74 05 78 (cell)

 

Alexandra Viets, Communications Officer, IGSD

aviets@igsd.org (213) 321-0911

 

For additional background information, visit: http://www.igsd.org/

 

Alliance Commends UNEP Montreal Protocol Agreement

22 September 2007

PR Newswire (U.S.)

MONTREAL, Sept. 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy (Alliance), an industry coalition, commended the agreement reached today by the parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. "The agreement maintains the high standards set for this important environmental treaty," said John Mandyck, Alliance Chairman and Vice President for Government and International Relations for Carrier Corporation. "Today's agreement matches its past success at establishing tough environmental protection goals while balancing the economic means of achieving these goals," he said.

The Montreal Protocol celebrated its 20th anniversary this week at the 19th Meeting of the Parties, held in Montreal, Canada. The agreement announced today was to reduce remaining consumption of hydrochlorofluorocarbon compounds (HCFCs), important transition substances, by more than 20% in developed countries between the years 2010 and 2030. Furthermore, the parties for the first time agreed to a consumption baseline and phasedown schedule for HCFC consumption for developing countries that will reduce consumption of these compounds by approximately 50% over the years 2010 through 2040. The significant reduction agreement was achieved through the leadership of the United States and many other countries.

"The HCFC reductions will hasten the recovery of the earth's ozone layer and allow for the more rapid introduction of important technologies relying on non-ozone-depleting substances," said Mandyck. "The benefits are important from the perspective of protecting both the ozone layer as well as the climate." According to analysis by the Alliance, the greenhouse gas reductions could be equivalent to approximately 20% of the benefits projected to be achieved by the Kyoto Protocol, the world's first international treaty to reduce greenhouse gas emissions between 2008 and 2012.

The Montreal Protocol has been hailed as one of the most successful multilateral environmental agreements ever negotiated. First signed in 1987, the treaty has resulted in the rapid reduction of ozone-depleting substances relying on an integrated system of scientific, technical and economic assessment processes and implementation by developed and developing countries, with the help of important multilateral funding assistance for the developing countries. The treaty has shaved decades off the projected recovery date of the earth's ozone layer by reducing the concentration of ozone-depleting compounds in the atmosphere, thereby reducing exposure risks from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. The treaty had already been projected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions more than five times the impact of the Kyoto accord.

Mandyck also thanked the Government of Canada for its important contributions to maintaining momentum on this unprecedented environmental agreement and for hosting the 20th anniversary meeting. "Montreal and the Canadian contribution to the protection of the ozone layer has been steadfast and significant," he said.

The Alliance is a coalition of producers and users of fluorocarbon based technologies, including air-conditioning, refrigeration, foam insulation, solvents and aerosols. The Alliance has been recognized by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the United Nations Environment Programme for its global leadership in the ozone protection effort.

For Information Contact:

Kevin Fay (703) 801-3233, or

John Mandyck (860) 674-3006

SOURCE The Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy

Kevin Fay, +1-703-801-3233, or John Mandyck, +1-860-674-3006, both for The Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy

International Agreement Likely to Phase-Out Ozone-Depleting Substances

http://www.ercweb.com/resources/tips.aspx

AN EARLY FREEZE TO STOP THE WARMING- THE URGENCY OF AN ACCELERATED PHASE-OUT FOR HCFCS

The Montreal Protocol faces a unique opportunity on its 20th anniversary to build on its unparalleled record of success. By accelerating the phase out of HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons)

http://www.eia-international.org/

Stratospheric Ozone Protection Awards

In 1990, EPA established the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Awards to recognize exceptional leadership, personal dedication, and technical achievements in protecting the Earth’s stratospheric ozone layer. In the first eighteen years, The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award has been presented to 509 individuals, organizations and teams from 42 countries. In 2007, 14 individuals, organizations, associations and teams earned the award through originality and public purpose, moral and persuasive leadership, and elimination of emissions of ozone-depleting substances.

List of all Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award winners
Best-of-the-Best Awards

 

Statement by the White House Press Secretary

WASHINGTON, D.C., Sept. 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Under President Bush's continued leadership in ozone layer protection, the Montreal Protocol Parties have agreed to the United States' proposal to accelerate by ten years the remaining phase out of certain ozone depleting substances. This action will not only speed up recovery of the ozone layer, but also represents one of the most significant new global actions to confront climate change by reducing the greenhouse gas profile of the phased-out substances.

Under this historic agreement, developed countries will phase out the production of Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) by 2020, and developing nations will phase out the production of HCFCs by 2030. This will reduce the potential emissions of remaining harmful ozone chemicals by about half.

While the Montreal Protocol has already made great strides to heal the ozone, our investments in advanced technology have paid off and a quicker phase out is possible.

Faster healing of the ozone layer will help prevent human health damages cause by excess UV radiation, including skin cancer.

And, this agreement will have substantial climate change benefits because it will reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with the phased out substances and spur development of new alternatives to these ozone depleting substances that have low or no greenhouse gas emissions. The accelerated phaseout's potential benefits could equal or exceed what the current Kyoto Protocol commitment might achieve.

Since the Montreal Protocol was signed in 1987, the US has achieved a 90% reduction in the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances. Worldwide, the Montreal Protocol has cut in half the amount of global warming caused by ozone-destroying chemicals that would have occurred by 2010.

SOURCE White House Press Office

CONTACT: White House Press Office, +1-202-456-2580

EFCTC Press Release
Brussels, 14 September, 2007: The European Fluorocarbon Technical Committee (EFCTC) celebrates the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol.

EFCTC the European Fluorocarbons Association celebrates the 20th Anniversary of the Montreal Protocol, which was signed on September 16, 1987. It would like to congratulate the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the Multi-lateral Fund and its Secretariat, the Implementing Agencies, the Parties to the Protocol and all the stakeholders who have been instrumental in making the Montreal Protocol one of the most successful global environmental agreements.

EFCTC welcomes the initiative of the coming Meeting of the Parties to discuss an accelerated HCFC phase-down for developing countries – fostering thereby the further reduction of ODS (Ozone Depleting Substances) emissions.

Commenting on the significance of this occasion, Nick Campbell, EFCTC Chairman, takes the opportunity to recall that "by introducing HFCs as one of the main CFCs substitutes, we have simultaneously benefited both the Ozone Layer and the Climate".

Indeed, on one hand CFCs replacements like HCFCs and HFCs allowed a swift improvement in reducing the ozone impact of Fluorocarbons (see Figure 1), used mainly for refrigeration and air-conditioning, building insulating foams, medical aerosols, etc.

CEFIC Avenue E. van Nieuwenhuyse 4 B - 1160 Brussels Belgium Tel: +32 2 676 72 11 Fax: +32 2 676 73 01 mail@cefic.be www.cefic.org Page 1 of 3

On the other hand, it is today acknowledged that replacing high quantities of high GWP (Global Warming Potential) CFCs by lower quantities of lower GWP HFCs, contributed dramatically to reduce their Climate Impact - about 3-4 times the objectives of the Kyoto Protocol.

"The conclusion of the IPCC/TEAP Special Report, Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System, puts this achievement into perspective," says Campbell, “HFC radiative forcing (cumulative contribution to global warming) will remain below 1% of the estimated radiative forcing of all greenhouse gases in 2015, while, in terms of yearly emissions, they will account for 2% of greenhouse gas emissions” (see Figure 2).

Ends.

For further information contact:

Nick Campbell, Chairman EFCTC nick.campbell@arkemagroup.com

Véronique Garny, CEFIC

Tel. 0032 2 676 7232 vga@cefic.be

CEFIC Avenue E. van Nieuwenhuyse 4 B - 1160 Brussels Belgium Tel: +32 2 676 72 11 Fax: +32 2 676 73 01 mail@cefic.be http://www.cefic.org/