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Extreme Climate Events
2005 was a year of climatic extremes. The first disaster struck early in January in Guyana, as torrential rains, the heaviest recorded since 1888, forced thousands of people from their homes in Georgetown (IFRC 2005). The drought that took place in central and south-eastern Amazonia is believed to be the worst in 40 years. The Amazon River approached the lowest level recorded in the past 100 years in its central reach, at Manaus (CPTEC 2005). Drought also hit the Pantanal and southern Cerrado eco-regions in Paraguay, and the Chaco thorn forest in Argentina. The tropical storm season in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean was especially severe. Hurricane Stan, in late September and early October, impacted heavily the southern coasts of Mexico (including the Yucatan(IFRC 2005). The drought that took place in central and south-eastern Amazonia is believed to be the worst in 40 years.

The Amazon River approached the lowest level recorded in the past 100 years in its central reach, at Manaus (CPTEC 2005). Drought also hit the Pantanal and southern Cerrado eco-regions in Paraguay, and the Chaco thorn forest in Argentina.
The tropical storm season in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean was especially severe. Hurricane Stan, in late September and early October, impacted heavily the southern coasts of Mexico (including the Yucatan peninsula) and was one of the most devastating events since Hurricane Mitch struck the region in 1998 (Box 1). More than 1 000 deaths were recorded in the region.
Hurricane Wilma inflicted serious damage on infrastructure, especially tourism infrastructure, in the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico (NOAA 2005a).
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